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Welcome to Thursday

March 20, 2014

A Sampling of NASA and other resources focused on Solar Energy:

The PG&E Solar Schools program teaches the value of renewable energy and energy efficiency to K-12 public schools in Northern and Central California. By turning school buildings into hands-on science experiments, this program makes science fun and teaches students how their everyday actions can positively impact the environment.

The PG&E Solar Schools program teaches the value of renewable energy and energy efficiency to K-12 public schools in Northern and Central California. By turning school buildings into hands-on science experiments, this program makes science fun and teaches students how their everyday actions can positively impact the environment.

NEED: National Energy Education
Development Project

UC Berkeley’s Center for Science Education has partnered with NEED on the NASA-funded Energy from the Sun on Earth and in Space grant to bring the science of the Sun and solar energy to California classrooms. NEED has an impressive array of teacher materials and resources to explore energy of the Sun in K-12 classrooms.

Solar Cell Energy Availability from
Around the Country

This is a teacher-designed lesson for you and your students. You can use NASA data to determine areas of the country which are most likely to produce solar energy by analyzing differences in incoming solar radiation graphs.

Grade Level: 8 - 12

Powering the Future (NASA)

Learn how NASA Glenn has contributed to the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System—a solar power system that is large enough to cover a football field!

Electrical power is the most critical resource for the International Space Station because it allows the crew to live comfortably, to safely operate the station and to perform scientific experiments. Since the only readily available source of energy for spacecraft is sunlight, NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland has pioneered, and continues to develop, technologies to efficiently convert solar energy to electrical power. 

SMUD—Sacramento Municipal Utility District

SMUD, another partner on the Energy from the Sun on Earth and in Space project, is a great resource for helping teachers and students learn about solar energy.  SMUD offers a variety of resources for K-12 educators and students, including printed materials, workshops, online games and activities for children. The link provides classroom materials, energy links and online activities to mention only a few of the resources you will find.

Women in Computer Science

Student Observation Network:
Solar Energy for Space Exploration

Astronauts on the International Space Station, or ISS, are working to improve life on Earth and to extend life beyond their home planet. The International Space Station is more than 300 km (186 miles) away from the ground. It's too far to run an electric cord. How does NASA supply energy to run the space station?  Visit the Student Observation Network’s Living and Working in Space--Energy to learn about NASA’s challenges and solutions for powering the ISS and the science experiments it carries.  Choose a problem-based learning activity and prepare for an exciting learning experience.

Grade Level: 5 - 8

 Energy Kid's Page from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.  Includes: "What is Energy?" "Energy Sources" "Using and Saving Energy" "History of Energy" and "Games and Activities."

There is also a Teachers Guide and a Glossary.

Solar Schools Program - PG&E Energy Workshops and Curriculum
   

Renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies are key to creating a clean energy future for not only the nation, but the world. This Web site describes NREL's research in renewable energy technologies, and also provides information on energy efficiency and various applications of renewable energy.

 

 An interesting article from The New York Times about harnessing the Sun's energy for our use on Earth.